The 25 Years On… event in Harrow aims to shift the focus back to African history in line with the aims of Black History Month (BHM)

The 25 Years On... event in Harrow aims to shift the focus back to African history in line with the aims of Black History Month (BHM)

The 25 Years On… event in Harrow aims to shift the focus back to African history in line with the aims of Black History Month (BHM), first introduced into Britain in 1987. The audience will hear first hand accounts of why BHM was introduced and how the first three African British MPs came to be selected and elected

Despite the recent waning of support within some circles, Black History Month (BHM) is still a ubiquitous marker on the British calendar – it’s marked by numerous councils, schools, libraries, museums, unions, newspapers, magazines, community organisations, and even commercial entities that wish to be seen to be doing their equality or diversity bit.

Whilst some of the content may be suspect, BHM is increasingly taking place not just within the designated month of October, but also beyond. For this reason, some call it Black History Season.

Others are now calling it African History Month (AHM), in a bid to bring it in line with its raison d’etre. Set up 25 years ago by Greater London Council (GLC) successor and affiliated organisations, and progressive London boroughs, BHM was meant to bring global African history and contributions at home and abroad into mainstream awaress, in addition to advocating an anti-racist and anti-apartheid agenda.

Its introduction in 1987 and subsequent adoption by mainly London councils, was predicated upon signing up to the African Jubilee Declaration, which included recommendations for activities that recognised the contribution of Africans to the economic, cultural and political life of London and the UK. The Declaration drew its strength from sections of the 1976 Race Relations Act, which enjoined statutory bodies to “promote race equality, equality of opportunity and good relations between persons of different racial groups”.

Contributing via video to 25 Years On… will be Addai Sebo, recognised as the person who introduced BHM. On the panel will be his then boss at the London Strategic Policy Unit, Ansel Wong, plus special guests who helped champion BHM across London.

The second half of the event focuses on the behind the scenes work that resulted in the selection and eventual election of the first three African British MPs in 1987 – Diane Abbott, Bernie Grant, and Paul Boateng. The panel includes Marc Wadsworth, former chair and campaign organiser of the Labour Party’s Black Sections, whose work also led to the selection of numerous African and Asian councillors across the country.

The free event takes place on October 30 in the Council Chamber at Harrow Civic Centre. It’s organised by WHEAT MST in association with Akoben Awards and chaired by history consultant and Akoben Awards co-ordinator Kwaku.

For more information or to book: www.25YearsOn.eventbrite.com, wheatsmst@gmail.com.

ENDS

Kwaku
www.TAOBQ.blogspot.com
editor@BritishBlackMusic.com

Region: All
Start Date: 30/10/2012
End Date: 30/10/2012
Start Time: 18:00
Venue: Council Chamber, Harrow Civic Centre
Venue Address: Station Road, Harrow
Celebs Attending: Marc Wadsworth, Ansel Wong, Roger McKenzie, Kwaku, Addai Sebo (via video)
Website: http://25yearson.eventbrite.com
Press Tickets: Not Available
Sponsorship: Not Available
 
Press Tickets:
Name: Kwaku
Phone: 020 8450 5987